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Audiovisual

Audio Arts | Tate.

Inlay (reverse) for Audio Arts Volume 8 Nos 2 and 3 published in 1987 Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3 Volume 8 Nos 2 and 3 © William Furlong

Inlay (reverse) for Audio Arts Volume 8 Nos 2 and 3 published in 1987
Archive reference: TGA200414/7/3 Volume 8 Nos 2 and 3
© William Furlong

 

So this is a blog focusing on visual material, but an importrant archive of audio capturing artists’ in their own words, as well as some soundworks and performances, has been released online by the Tate Archive.

For over 30 years, from 1973-2004, Audio Arts magazine was produced and distributed on audio cassettes. Founded by British artist Bill Furlong, it was conceived as a magazine of audio focused on the British and international contemporary art scene. Some images from the cassette inlays are featured here.

As old formats become obsolete, or the machines that can play them become ever more scarce, online archives such as the Tate’s ensures that the valuable content of these documents is made available to a new generation of artists, enthusiasts and scholars.

Here’s a photo of the inlay from an issue featuring an Andy Warhol interview in the year of his death, and Gilbert and George at the Venice Biennale.audio-arts-volume-24-inlay_0

Calling Upon the Muses:
Teaching Spotlight on Prof. Keely Heuer

This past Fall, we in the Art History department welcomed Keely Heuer to the faculty as our specialist in ancient art.

I am happy to report that her energetic and engaging teaching included a delightful extra credit project, Becoming a Masterpiece, for her students in Art of the Western I survey.

She challenged her students–

“Put on your thinking caps, and call upon the Muses…the Idea: create a living work of art by replicating famous objects from the past and photograph yourself doing so. At the very least, you must be in the picture, but you can recruit friends and family to join you as well. The only limit is your imagination.”

Here are the results! Can you identify the works of art?

(Interactive “game” here? click to reveal captions?)

Brandeis’ Nancy Scott Gives Talk on Georgia O’Keeffe

This past Wednesday, November 20, The Art History Association of SUNY New Paltz, a student club of the Student Association, hosted a talk by Brandeis University Professor Nancy Scott on American artist, Georgia O’Keeffe, entitled “Ladder to the Moon: Georgia O’Keeffe and the American Southwest.”

Prof. Scott offered new insight about O’Keeffe’s later work grounded in new research based on the painter’s voluminous correspondence with husband, photographer and influential gallerist, Alfred Stieglitz, and others. Prof. Scott’s forthcoming book on O’Keeffe will be published by Reaktion Books.

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Joins the Google Art Project

Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Joins the Google Art Project

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Partnership Provides Global Access to High-resolution Images of 160 Artistically and Historically Important Objects in the Colonial Williamsburg Collections. Check the blog post at ArtFixDaily.com.

A Windfall of Warhol: Rediscovered Photos of a Pop Art Legend

 

Andy Warhol Holding a Sunflower

A Windfall of Warhol: Rediscovered Photos of a Pop Art Legend.

“What Do Cats Have to Do With It?” Indeed

 

LACMA (Los Angeles County Museum of Art) announced that they have made 20,000 high quality images of works in their collections available for download for free and unrestricted use! They have also unveiled a new, easy to use, non-heirarchical website to discover works that students can use for research or term papers–or anything else that takes your fancy. Here’s a sample screenshot with the download link highlighted. Read more on their blog at What Do Cats Have to Do With It? Welcome to Our New Collections Website | Unframed The LACMA Blog.

 

RIP Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol @ Christie's.

The end of analogue film: Rage, rage against the dying of the dark | The Economist

The youngest crop of [Burley's] students, all digital natives, have never touched analogue film. So, despite embracing (and teaching) digital photography, Mr Burley also developed a course, now in its third year, which recaps the history of photographic processes, from glass plates to the present day. It is exotic for them to spend the day working slowly with their hands instead of in front of a digital screen, he says. The instant availability of digital photographs means students are never surprised by what they make. The course lets them appreciate the “objecthood” of the photographic image.

The end of analogue film: Rage, rage against the dying of the dark | The Economist.

Northwestern-Art Institute Partnership Expands With Grant: Northwestern University News

Mary Cassatt, Sketch of Margaret Sloane, Looking Right, 1893

Center will be a new national model of collaborative scientific research in the arts

via Northwestern-Art Institute Partnership Expands With Grant: Northwestern University News.

Amsterdam’s New Stedelijk Museum – NYTimes.com

AMSTERDAM — Offhand I can’t recall seeing a more ridiculous looking building than the new Stedelijk Museum, which recently opened here. Shaped like a bathtub, of all things, it arrives years behind schedule at the tail end of the money-fueled, headline-hungry, erratically ingenious era of indulgent museum design that began to peter out with the global economy. Compared with no-frills, cost-effective, almost penitential, post-meltdown designs like Herzog and de Meuron’s stylish Parrish Museum in the Hamptons, it’s a throwback.

via Amsterdam’s New Stedelijk Museum – NYTimes.com.